Eat fiber-rich foods now, not later!

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There are a few different classifications of fiber, and their common characteristic is resistance to digestion in the human small intestine.   Eating fiber-rich foods is associated with a number of health benefits:

  • Fiber promotes weight maintenance by slowing gastric emptying; and adding volume to food, promoting satiety
  • Fiber helps to prevent diabetes by slowing entrance of glucose into the bloodstream, curbing glucose (and insulin) spikes after meals
  • Soluble fiber (a type of fiber abundant in oats and beans) has cholesterol-lowering effects.
  • Cardiovascular health – a pooled analysis of 10 prospective studies found that an increase of 10 grams of dietary fiber per day was associated with a 24% decrease in deaths from coronary heart disease.
  • Digestive health – fiber adds bulk and acts as a stool softener, making bowel movements faster and easier, and preventing constipation and diverticular disease.
  • Fermentation of fiber and resistant starch by bacteria in the large intestine helps to prevent colorectal cancers
  • variety-of-beans

Fiber vs. fiber-rich foods: Fiber can be isolated and taken as a supplement or added to a processed food, but these are not the recommended ways to get your fiber.  Although fiber itself has beneficial properties, fiber-rich whole foods come packaged with disease-fighting phytochemicals.  There have been inconsistencies in the results of studies on fiber and colorectal cancer, probably because it appears to be high-fiber foods, not fiber alone that reduces risk.

The American Heart Association recommends consuming 25 grams of fiber each day –a nutritarian diet far exceeds that recommendation, providing about 60-80 grams of fiber each day, since the vast majority of my recommended food pyramid is made up of fiber-rich foods like vegetables, fruits, seeds and beans.

A study relating dietary fiber intake to lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease was once presented at the American Heart Association’s Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism conference. Data from the 2003-2008 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were analyzed. The researchers used a mathematical algorithm to predict lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease, based on diet, blood pressure, cholesterol, smoking, and history of diabetes.  All of the participants were free of cardiovascular disease at the start.

The algorithm placed participants in groups of either high or low lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease.  Then they were arranged into four groups according to the ratio of their intake of dietary fiber to calories – dietary fiber only, no fiber supplements were included.  The lowest fiber intake was 0.1g/1000 calories, and the highest was on par with a nutritarian diet, 49.1g/1000 calories.

Individuals aged 20-39 in the highest quartile of fiber intake were almost twice as likely to be in the low risk category than those in the lowest quartile. Middle aged individuals in the highest quartile were about 50% more likely to be in the low risk category. Interestingly though, a similar association was not seen in 60-79 year olds.  The researchers theorized that many older adults with high fiber intake may have already developed significant risk for heart disease before they added more high-fiber foods to their diet.   They concluded that starting to increase fiber intake at a younger age helps to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease later in life.

It is important to eat healthfully your entire life to get maximum benefits, however once you have not eaten properly for the first 60 years, then to get the disease-protective benefits to dramatically reduce heart attack, stroke and cancer risk from a plant-based diet (vegan or flexitarian) later in life, it is not good enough to just be good, you have to be great.  In other words, a nutritarian diet with attention to the most nutritionally powerful and protective plant foods is necessary, not just the dietary mediocrity practiced by most vegans and vegetarians.

Eating to Live is a lifetime commitment – just like it takes years for heart disease to develop, it takes years to build up protection against heart disease.  No matter what your age, you can benefit from improving your diet – but the point is, the time to start is right now and the place to start is with a nutritarian diet that pays attention to the disease-fighting nutrients in foods. Once you are past middle age, the way to start is not with some wishy-washy low fat, high fiber diet.  That is not good enough, you have to do better than that and pay attention to the micronutrient-richness of your meals and achieve comprehensive nutritional adequacy, which is the core of my message.  .

Joel Fuhrman, M.D.